Joe Rocket Reactor 3.0 Jacket

  • Combined 1.2mm leather, FreeAir™ poly/mesh & RockTex 660™ outer shell
  • FullFlex™ System – precision tailored fusion of pliable mesh (underarm/shoulder/back) and articulated back expansion panels, drastically augmenting mobility
  • C.E. approved armor at the shoulders and elbows
  • Removable spine pad with pocket for optional C.E. spine protector
  • Removable windproof liner
  • 6-point SureFit™ custom adjustment system (adjustable sleeves, wrists, & waist)
  • Snap loops for attaching jacket to belt
  • 8” zipper for pant attachment
  • Reflective stripe

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MSRP:
$239.99 - $254.99
,  Our Price:
$215.99 - $229.49

Sizing Information

This new Reactor 3.0 seems to fit just like the new Comet jacket (the solid textile/leather cousin), so I’ll repeat the same sizing advice as offered on that product page: We checked the sizing of this jacket against Joe Rocket’s size chart and found the estimated chest sizes to be accurate, and Joe Rocket’s size chart is very “standard” (no surprises). We also tried on a Med and XL on our Fit Check mannequins Huey and Dewey and they look great (view those shots by taking the View Larger Images link above). Therefore, I recommend you choose the size jacket you normally wear in men’s clothing. You can use the chart to choose if you know your chest size.

If you have a bit of a belly you can measure your belly with a tape to make sure the jacket size you choose will be big enough. The max belly size for each jacket is about 6” less than the chest size. For example, the men’s XL has a 46-48 inch chest and a max belly of about 40 to 42 inches.

The overall cut of the sleeves from the elbow area down is pretty trim in this jacket. The trim fit feels good because it helps keep the elbow armor in a good position, but if you have larger-than-average arms, this jacket will likely be too tight in the sleeves for you. It will be fine for those with average to skinny arms.

Need help measuring? Get it here.

Product Video

Our Two Cents

I really like this new Reactor 3.0 jacket. Every rider knows that summer heat can make wearing a jacket pretty uncomfortable, but jackets like this one that are designed with large portions of the shell that are made of flow-thru mesh fabric make it all better. I’ve found that a mesh jacket actually will be MORE comfortable than no jacket at all on long rides, especially when the sun is beating down. The wind still blows through but the jacket will help cut down on wind burn and sun burn. Many people are skeptical about the protective capabilities of ALL mesh styles and if that is a concern for you then this leather/mesh style might just be the thing. Leather is used in likely impact areas and the leather also adds to the jacket’s overall structure and makes it feel like the armor will be better kept in position in case of a fall. And just from an aesthetic point of view, I really like how the leather/mesh looks and feels. The only downside to this particular model is the removable rain liner. The fabric feels more like a rain barrier you’d find incorporated between the inner liner and outer shell of a waterproof jacket. I’m sure it would do a good job for its intended purpose… to keep you dry in a rain, but the fabric feels like rubbery plastic and makes it hard to stick your arm through the sleeve. Most people won’t even use it, but I wouldn’t be doing my duty if I didn’t warn you… Anyway, all the other features are usual: Plenty of pockets, fit adjustment, night time reflectives. zipper connection to Joe Rocket pants or alternately, loops to connect to your jeans belt. We’ve put together an excellent photo spread of all this for you. Just click the “View Larger Images” link above to see them… oh, and we have a shot of the dreadful removable rain liner too :) Overall, I really like this style for summer. It will give you good looks and confidence! :: Paul, 03-04-13

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